DUEK DISSERTATION DEFENSE

Karen Duek will be defending her dissertation at 11:30am on Monday, June 19th, in HUM 1 Room 210. Karen’s dissertation is titled “Sorting a complex world: an experimental study of polysemy and copredication in container and committee nominals.” The committee consists of Adrian Brasoveanu (chair), Donka Farkas, and Pranav Anand.

WHAT WE’RE DOING WITH OUR SUMMER VACATION

  • Jeff Adler will be spend the summer in Tokyo, Japan, as part of the NSF East Asia and Pacific Summer Institute program. He will conduct experimental research in phonology under Shigeto Kawahara (visiting undergrad UCSC alum) at Keio University. He will also be hanging out with Junko and Armin in their cool Tokyo apartment, continuing their work on Japanese accent.
  • Sandy Chung will travel to the Mariana Islands for two weeks of work on the Chamorro dictionary project. Then she’ll join Jim in Dublin for two weeks in the second half of July. The rest of the summer she’ll spend getting used to retirement… 🙂
  • Donka Farkas will be in Broek in Waterland, an idyllic village near Amsterdam, between June 26 and June 29, participating in a workshop on Inquisitiveness below and beyond the sentence boundary. The workshop is hosted by the Inquisitive Semantics group at the University of Amsterdam, one of whose organizers is former LRC visitor Floris Roelofsen. On the program you will see familiar names such as Jakub Dotlacil, a former post doc at UCSC, and alum Kyle Rawlins.
  • Hitomi Hirayama will spend the first half of the summer in Japan, where she will give talks in Tokyo and in Hokkaido on what she has worked on this year: ignorance inferences and biased questions in Japanese.
  • Junko Ito and Armin Mester are planning to spend the Summer in Tokyo working at NINJAL (National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics) working with Haruo Kubozono and others on various projects relating to Japanese accent.
  • Jim McCloskey will be travelling to Dublin almost as soon as the quarter ends to teach a two-week seminar on ‘Contemporary Irish Syntax’. The seminar is part of the biennial summer school of the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, which will take place this year between July 3rd and July 14th. The seminar will meet every day except Sunday July 9th and after that, all bets are off.
  • Maho Morimoto will be attending the Acoustical Society of America Boston meeting in June to present a poster of the same title as her QE, and will be doing linguistic fieldwork in Oaxaca in July.
  • Jed Pizarro-Guevara will travel to Lexington, KY to enjoy bourbon, and present a paper based on his second qualifying paper at the Morphological Typology and Linguistic Cognition Workshop (co-organized by UCSC alum, Adam Ussishkin). He will also be working with Kelsey S., Maziar, and Matt to develop materials for sentence processing experiments in SLZ (and closely related varieties). Before the quarter starts, he will fly to the madre patria to collect data for his QE and other projects. He also hopes to collect lots of naturally occurring data involving portmanteaus in Tagalog, and sample every silog on breakfast menus. His favorite is bangsilog (BANGus ‘milkfish’ + SInangag ‘fried rice’ + itLOG‘egg’).
  • Tom Roberts will be heading to Estonia to pick mushrooms, wish desperately to hang out with Estonian president Kersti Kaljulaid, and conduct experimental work on polar questions. He’ll also be continuing existing fieldwork investigations on discourse, attitudes, and dialectal variation in negation. He’ll conclude the summer presenting his QP work on Estonian responsive predicates at Sinn und Bedeutung 22 in Berlin.
  • Kelsey Sasaki will be returning to Hawai’i to continue researching Hawai’i Creole and to visit with family there. Back on the mainland, she’ll be working with Santiago Laxopa Zapotec speakers in LA; designing a psycholinguistic experiment on SLZ with Jed, Steven, Matt, and Maziar; and helping to organize the Nido de Lenguas.
  • Jake Vincent will be conducting fieldwork on Chamorro for the first part of the summer, investigating interpretive differences between its head-internal and head-external relative clauses. He’ll also be TAing for Semantics I during the first summer session (taught by Adrian Brasoveanu), doing exploratory research for an experimental syntax project on the processing of islands, and later in the summer, helping out with Nido de Lenguas, a linguocultural event focusing on Oaxacan languages.
  • Erik Zyman will continue to investigate “unusual” movements in P’urhepecha and what they tell about the driving force for movement; English adverb stranding and what it reveals about the precise timing and operation of late adjunction; whether prefixes in Latinate English verbs are incorporated syntactically autonomous particles (Harley 2008); and (with Nick Kalivoda) what (anti)mirror effects tell about XP- and X°-movement in the Latin verb.

WLMA SYMPOSIUM ON OAXACAN LINGUISTICS

Capping off the inaugural year of the Workshop on the Languages of Meso-America is the Symposium on Oaxacan Linguistics on Monday, June 12 from 9am-5pm in Hum 1, Room 210. The symposium will feature talks on a variety of languages by invited speakers Christian DiCanio (SUNY Buffalo) Emiliana Cruz (UMass Amherst), and Eric Campbell (UCSB), as well as UCSCers Jason Ostrove, Steven Foley, Nick Kalivoda, and Kelsey Sasaki. For more information, see the full program here.

LURC 2017

This year’s Linguistics Undergraduate Research Conference
(LURC) will take place on Friday, June 2, featuring talks by four current students:

  • Richard Bibbs: “Chamorro Agent Reduplication”
  • Brianda Caldera: “Border Slang”
  • Justin Talbott: “Polynesian Pull Chains & Factorial Typology”
  • Anny Huang: “The Event Structure of Mandarin Chinese Resultatives”

The Distinguished Alumna Address will be given by Maura O’Leary (BA, 2013), currently a PhD student at UCLA, on “Constraints on Noun Phrase Evaluation Times.” The conference will begin at 12:45pm on Friday in the Stevenson Fireside Lounge–see the full program here.

LIN COLLOQUIUM

This Friday, May 26th, at 2:40pm in Humanities 2, Room 259, there will be a colloquium by Susan Lin (Berkeley). Her talk is entitled “Gradience from variation in articulatory magnitude and timing,” and the abstract is given below:

Gradient synchronic variation in speech has long been proposed to be at the root of most sound change, whether through the generation of phonemically ambiguous speech or the creation of phonological innovations available to language learners. However, there exists a disconnect between this form of gradient variation and its typically discrete resulting phonological form. In this talk, I examine two articulatory factors thought to contribute to gradient variation: the magnitude and relative timing of articulations. Using ultrasound data, I focus on the relationship between articulatory magnitude and timing in post-vocalic laterals in English, while exploring some of the factors, including lexical frequency and speech speed, which contribute to that relationship.

ALTSHULER AT S-CIRCLE/LALOCO

In a special joint meeting of S-Circle and LaLoCo, we have this week a talk by Daniel Altshuler (Hampshire College/UMass Amherst) at 11:45am on Tuesday, May 23rd, in Stevenson 217. He’ll be presenting on “Temporal cataphora and revision,” details of which can be found in the abstract below:

Inferring a rhetorical relation between two discourse units (DUs) is non-monotonic: given a discourse context C and two DUs π1, π2 to be related by a relation R, it may be that C makes R(π1, π1) the most plausible inference, but an extension of C may make it more plausible that a distinct R'(π1, π1) is preferred (Asher and Lascarides 2003). Since rhetorical relations often entail temporal constraints, anaphoric connections between eventualities often undergo revision. This is especially apparent in the French novella, Sylvie, where, famously, the reader chooses a resolution strategy that she later finds to be incoherent and is thus forced to revise. The goal of this talk is to derive the incoherence and model the revision that the reader is forced to make. To do so, we extend Haug’s (2014) PCDRT to the temporal domain and to temporal cataphora in particular, taking important strides to synthesizing this framework with Asher and Lascarides’s (2003) SDRT, something that we think is necessary to model (in)coherence and the provisional nature of phoric expressions

POLIĆ RECEIVES OUTSTANDING STAFF AWARD

This year’s UCSC Outstanding Staff Award goes to Irena Polić, managing director of UCSC’s Institute for Humanities Research. Irena has long been a major part of our department, both as a student (BA 2001, MA 2003) and for her countless hours of work connecting linguists to the many opportunities afforded by the IHR, which supports much of the work done by students and faculty alike. Read more about Irena’s journey, and why she believes the humanities still play a vitally important role in our society, here.